Taps

I was at a restaurant this past weekend and the tap was interesting. The long, cylindrical cross-section of the pipe was separated from the knob that controls the water flow. The knob was about six inches away, at the same level as the sink/bowl. Good-looking stuff and water-guzzler.

I’ve been meaning to go to the design schools and ask them if they experiment on taps or if all their students do their projects on taps.

The fancier the restaurant or the mall, the fancier the taps. Fancier mostly means difficult to figure out. You’ll have people looking at the next guy trying to figure out how to get some water flowing so that they can wash their hands. These tap designers probably won design compeitions and this in places where the judges don’t wash hands.

In my experience, the taps that are easiest to use are the ones where you turn a round knob or where you swing a ‘handle’ from one side to another. They’re easy to figure out and the user doesn’t come out feeling stupid.

Question for designers: You do want people to use your taps, don’t you?

Then again, if you’ve never washed your hands…

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